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onAsyncClick sometimes does not work
#1
Some languages allow unicode characters for variable names. PHP does that and so does Delphi. Unfortunately AJAX does not recognise unicode characters in variable names so it is necessary to change all intraweb component names so that they contain only ASCI characters. Problem shows only with onAsyncClick, not with onClick.
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#2
This is as designed, or better, this won't be implemented. You are probably the only developer I've ever known that wants to use accented and some weird chars in variable names.
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#3
Not accented. National characters like Russian or Chinese.
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#4
Why do you need to have control names using those chars? Do you know any Delphi library/framework (not only Delphi actually, but written in *any* language) which uses Chinese or Cyrillic in their code?
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#5
Yes I do know. All code that is not sold abroad has local national characters. It is te same that PHP allows. In books for students of computer science I read variable names using national characters. It is easier to understand the code and to learn that way. If we used only ASCI code, that would mean only English words for variable names. Thinking that way we should discontinue all spoken languages, articles in the languages and leave only one language in the world.

Russian, Greek, Chinese is particularly often used as variable names as they have totally different characters.
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#6
(12-31-2019, 01:41 PM)MrSpock Wrote: Yes I do know. All code that is not sold abroad has local national characters. It is te same that PHP allows. In books for students of computer science I read variable names using national characters. It is easier to understand the code and to learn that way. If we used only ASCI code, that would mean only English words for variable names. Thinking that way we should discontinue all spoken languages, articles in the languages and leave only one language in the world.

Russian, Greek, Chinese is particularly often used as variable names as they have totally different characters.
It is best to think of computer languages as what they are, languages themselves.

Just as any other language (English, Greek, Chinese), computer languages have their own character set.  Some distinguish between upper and lower case, nearly all define what characters can be used as the first character of names.  That is, they define their character set and usage. 

Trying to write English prose using Chinese characters probably isn't a good idea.

I suggest sticking with the character set defined for the language.  Including Delphi.  Expecting a native English speaker to understand an article written with Chinese characters is probably not going to work... even if the writer thinks it is a good idea.

That's just my observation.

Dan
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